How to write a ballad - I remain wary so any help or advice?

in

I want to write a ballad but every time I attempt to write one I side-track and end up with an ordinary free-verse...

Any advice or tips?

Answer: 
1) Do not worry about the rhyme; it will be the last to take care of. But be careful to follow the meter. 2) Make it small. Two three stanza will do. 3) To have another good ballad next to you open or ready to open on another page of your text editor, may inspire you. 4) Do not worry about the number of syllables of each line. Make one line big, one smaller, varying the lengths. The free architectural arrangement of it, upon the page, defines a large part of its beauty. 5) Start it and do not pay much attention to the main theme. It may evolve into something else, or it may be abstract - it doesn't matter at this point. 6) The power of habit is hard to break. But it is also easier to break, than it first appears. Good luck ----------------------------------------------------------------------- Ballade Of A Great Weariness by Dorothy Parker There's little to have but the things I had, There's little to bear but the things I bore. There's nothing to carry and naught to add, And glory to Heaven, I paid the score. There's little to do but I did before, There's little to learn but the things I know; And this is the sum of a lasting lore: Scratch a lover, and find a foe. And couldn't it be I was young and mad If ever my heart on my sleeve I wore? There's many to claw at a heart unclad, And little the wonder it ripped and tore. There's one that'll join in their push and roar, With stories to jabber, and stones to throw; He'll fetch you a lesson that costs you sore: Scratch a lover, and find a foe. So little I'll offer to you, my lad; It's little in loving I set my store. There's many a maid would be flushed and glad, And better you'll knock at a kindlier door. I'll dig at my lettuce, and sweep my floor, Forever, forever I'm done with woe. And happen I'll whistle about my chore, "Scratch a lover, and find a foe." L'ENVOI Oh, beggar or prince, no more, no more! Be off and away with your strut and show. The sweeter the apple, the blacker the core: Scratch a lover, and find a foe! ------------------------------------------------------------- Maybe these people have something more to say: http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Ballad

How to start a poem about your mom?

in

I need to write a poem that is about someone important in my life. I picked my mother, and I have no clue where to start it. Any help?

Answer: 
She carried me and loved me from my beginning She nurtured and cared With no thoughts of winning.

How to make a cheer related to business?

in

We need to come up with a cheer related to business and it has to be something creative.

Answer: 
Not sure what you mean by "a cheer"... The best I can offer, is for you to Google other similarly related 'cheers'...Good Luck!

How to write a poem with these concepts?

in

Why are good memories always so fleeting? How can i not cry thinking about how good those times were and how I didnt treasure every day of those moments. I dont feel sad because my life is not as good, i feel bad because i took them for granted!!! I just feel so regretful.

Answer: 
-When we regret ... -We do not forget ... -The stone is set ... -The past's a bet ... -Good, now learn ... -To take this, turn ... -Take the blame ... -Feel the shame ... -Karma gives back ... -Flat as your tack ...

How to display context in a poetry essay?

in

I have an in class English essay tomorrow on Robert Frost's poetry and I've been told by my English teacher that I need to very briefly include some context of Robert Frost's life in my explanation of the quote in my essay. How would I structure a sentence to include this?

Answer: 
Since we don't know which Frost poem or poems you're going to be writing about, it's kind of hard to know what sort of sentence you'll be structuring. Your best best is to do a little reading on Frost's life (there's plenty of biographical information available online). That way, you'll have the basic facts at your fingertips, and you'll be able to mention whatever is relevant to the poem you're discussing. For example, if it's a love poem, you'll be able to write something about his marriage. If it's a poem that deals in some way with farm life or the New England landscape, you'll be able to say something about his connection to that part of the country. And so on.

How to show an understanding of a poem in an english essay?

in

I've got a controlled assesment on thursday and friday and I have to show an understanding of the poem 'Toads' and 'Toads Revisited'.

I was wondering what I could write to show that I had an understanding of the author's point of view and the author's desires.

Any answers would be great help, thankyou X

Answer: 
Go to sparknotes.com and/or gradesaver.com to have expert views on these. Good luck.

How to write a free verse poem about bullying?

in

I need to write a poem about bullying. I chose free verse because it has no rhyme scheme. I just cant find the right words for the poem. Can anyone help?

Answer: 
Go to wikihow.com>..>Works and learn in easy steps how to write a decent poem of any kind in no time at all. Good luck.

How to write a poem similar to Abandoned Farmhouse by Ted Kooser?

in

I have to write a similar poem, but a different situation/setting. Any ideas?

Answer: 
Try to read an in-depth analysis of the poem. This should inspire you with some ideas. Also, Google, How to write poetry in the style of *****, for further help.......Good Luck!

How to memorize 6 lines of a Shakespeare poem by tomorrow?

in

I need 6 lines of a Shakespeare poem memorized tomorrow to recite in front of my English class, it's like 100 points and I desperately need an A! How can I memorize those 6 lines by tomorrow?! Please help 10 points!

Answer: 
Memorizing just six lines of poetry isn't very difficult, especially if the lines use rhyme and/or meter, which give your memory some special things to hang onto. Start out by reading the lines out loud several times. Don't even try to memorize them at first. Just read them out loud maybe three or four times. Then try saying the lines without looking at the page. You won't have the whole thing memorized by that point, but you might be surprised by how much of it has stuck in your mind just from a few repetitions. Then you read it out loud a few more times, and try it without looking again. It won't take long to memorize the whole thing that way. Once you have the whole thing memorized, say it out loud several more times to really make sure you have it. (If there are words and phrases in the poem that you don't understand, be sure to look them up. It's possible to memorize something without knowing what it means, but it's much easier to memorize something you understand.)

How to represent a break in a line of poetry whilst quoting?

in

For an essay "To-night, a first movement, a pulse
As if the rain..."

How do I represent the break in one line?

Answer: 
To-night, a first movement, a pulse, As if the rain in bogland gathered head Those are the first two lines of Seamus Heaney's poem "Act of Union." To quote them in an essay, use a slash in place of a line break, like this: "To-night, a first movement, a pulse,/As if the rain in bogland gathered head" (If you quote more than two or three lines of a poem, it's best to set them apart from your prose text and lay them out with the poet's line breaks. But for a short quotation, replace line breaks with slashes.)

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