How to get pleasure horse in training to relax neck?

in

My little mare I have been working on is a very good pleasure horse prospect. I can't seem to get her to lower her head and neck, though. If I apply pressure on and off to her mouth she bows her neck instead of relaxing it. How can it get her to relax in the correct pleasure horse position? Thanks!

Answer: 
What you are looking for is a long and low position. First thing to do (you are going to hate this answer....) is to basically throw your reins away. Not literally. But, you will ride on the buckle or with as little contact as you can while maintaining control. Ride a consistent circle or on the rail so your horse understands what is expected of her steering wise. You will be astounded, once you stop nagging her face, just how long and low she will go. Do it all gaits starting with the walk until that is solid and progressing up. Next, you can add back in the rein once in this long and low position. If she responds so nicely to get off the bit when you apply a bit of pressure by sucking back her face off it (it's actually a smart and willing horse that does this...) add some leg. But think about this for a minute.... Horses who work that hard to avoid the bit are telling you something. One, they are smart and can figure things out. Two, perhaps your hands aren't so steady and soft and they just don't like them. Three, perhaps the bit is a rather strong for her liking. For number one, be pleased. For number two, try riding with your hands anchored mid-thigh pinkies glued to your quadricep--those are some steady hands (you are a human draw rein...). For number three, try a bit that encourages horses to lean on it and seek it some like a french-link or soft mullen mouth. There are lots of other on the buckle excercises to do like getting her cued into your seat and cued into your intentions. One rein stop (bending to a stop--really good for a soft neck), automatic/power steering (steer with your eyes and legs and only pickup rein if she missed the cue), downward transitions (again seat and intention aid only--pickup the rein only after she missed the cue). Those are really cool and helpful to a young horse prospect and will tell you something of her trainability and desire to please you and try hard. As riders we often do too much with our hands.

How to get on a college equestrian team?

in

I ride for fun basically but would love to ride in college on a team. I own my horse, we travel to some fun and local shows. Where I show in western pleasure and speed events. Is it possible for me to get on a equestrian team without have a trainer? Also what do I need to do?

Answer: 
Everyone makes the team even people who don't know how to ride. They put you in a showing category based on what level you have shown at. I really disagree with that because I can out ride most of the girls but can't afford to go anywhere but schooling and C rated shows so I had to go on a much lower non competitive level basically. Also you don't get to use your own horse they pick a name of a horse from another school the morning of the show and that's who you ride.

How can you teach a horse how to ride tackless?

in

So sometimes i'll feel like having a free ride and just a bomding ride so we'll ride tackless. Our bond is strong enough but he really doesnt listen to my cue's to turn and slow down ect. How can i teach him? I tried the rope around his neck and it didnt help much (especially cus he's not neck reigned) and he listens to my leg okay just not tackless cus he's so ecxited. Any ideas?

Answer: 
You can't "make" a horse do difficult work when you're tackless, and lots of turning and stopping in a round pen is very difficult work. Riding tackless is less a matter of training than it is a matter of relationship and communication. A friend of mine trains all his horses and teaches other people to train their horses, without any tack at all from the beginning. He teaches the horse that the human is listening and responding to the horse's concerns. It has nothing to do with "making" the horse do anything and it has nothing to do with the concept of "respect" as it is used by the NH clinicians. The horse actually learns to take care of the human and watch out for our fragile well-being, and they WANT to protect us. I'll take that over a horse that is worried about a stick smacking him in the face, any day! Since you're already riding and probably aren't going to want to spend 6 months to a year or more developing the relationship that Chuck teaches, I'll advise you to do what I did for years before I heard of Friendship Training. Ride with minimal tack, especially on the head. Use what you need in order to communicate with the horse, but use it as little as possible and wean yourself off of it. I'm saying wean yourself, because you need to change your own behavior if you want to change the horse's behavior. Use a halter if you can communicate well enough with it. If you're scared to give up the bit, use two sets of reins, one on the bridle and one on the halter. Use the halter reins instead of the bridle whenever possible, and refine your understanding of your horse so you can offer clearer, softer cues. Give up the whole notion of *making* him do anything, because you simply can't teach tackless with that mindset. It's about creating a mutual understanding, and that requires you as the executive partner to reach out and help the horse learn to trust your willingness to listen to his opinions. This is what will open him up to listening to your finer, subtler cues without any tack that can *make* him *obey* you. If you're already riding with a halter, switch from a rope halter with knots to a more comfortable, smooth, flat halter, and use that neck strap when you can, with the halter reins as backup if needed. Always work toward doing less *to* the horse, and doing more *with* him. Going tackless will not be a bonding experience if the depth of communication is not already there. It's really hard to bond with your horse while you're in a hospital bed. A neck strap is a good way to teach neck reining, by the way. Just pull the strap the way you want to go and use the reins if the horse doesn't understand or respond. If you can't teach neck reining, please don't get on your horse without tack. Use a helmet to protect your head!

How to get an outline and encourage a pony to use hindquarters?

in

My pony is heavy on the forehand. How can I make her lighter? And how can I make her go in an outline? Thanks.

Answer: 
What you have to do is lunge him and while lunging him you have to make him leave with impulsion. So simply start from a complete stop and then make him going straight into a trot so this means that him has to use his hind quarters because he has to push off from them. Do this the same in the saddle. Also when in the saddle you can do this while trotting - Apply on and off pressure with you leg to get him to speed up then apply on and off pressure on the reins to slow him down. To do this he will have to think 100% of his mind and use 100% of his body which includes his hind quarters. This will form a nice collective frame and is a good way to get him in tune. Once you have done that you can go over some trot poles which will help with his working frame. This is what I teach my intermediate students. For anymore info, help, training etc please contact me on horseycaitlin@ymail.com Hope this helps ;) CaitlinXx

How to treat open sore between horses udder?

in

I started noticing my mare having discharge on her back legs so I checked and she has a sore in between her udder. I assume it started from flies and than got worse from the constant rubbing. I have been using wonder dust and stuffing a piece of cotton in between to keep it from rubbing, which seems to help for only so long because of her walking around. Does anyone have any advice? I am at the point of thinking I just have to tie her up to limit movement. Any suggestions would help.

Answer: 
The udders are common sites for development of sarcoid tumors so this needs to be evaluated by a vet asap. I know you meant well but Wonder Dust is no longer ever recommended in wound treatment unless specified by a vet to dry up very specific exudating nonhealing ulcers. It is highly caustic and evokes a major immune rejection response. It kills healthy cells needed for healing (it is cytotoxic) and those dead cells become food for bacteria to promote infection. It will also prompt development of proud flesh and overscarring because of the damage and delayed healing it causes. Between interfering with immune functions, destroying cells needed for healing, and feeding bacteria, you can't ask for a worse wound treatment. At this point, you need a vet to do the prescribing. Until the vet gets there, you should flush the wounds with sterile 0.9% saline solution which will debride the wounds and remove bacteria without harming healthy tissue cells or irritating the horse the way using harsh disinfectant chemical solutions do. You can then apply otc Vetericyn gel spray available at equine or pet supply stores which will keep the wound bed moist and aid the immune system in healing and keeping infection at bay. Vetericyn will not interfere with any treatment your vet prescribes and your vet may prescribe prescription strength Vetericyn VF if this is a wound and not a sarcoid. If this is a sarcoid, then it can easily be worsened by any treatments you try to apply. Sterile isotonic 0.9% saline for wounds is available in a pressurized container at drugstores. It delivers the flush at the correct pressure, You can make it by dissolving 3/4 of a teaspoon of table salt (no iodine) into one pint of boiled water, let it cool to room temperature , and use a syringe to squirt it onto the wound using moderate pressure.

How to get the pony i ride stop cantering and trot?

in

I ride a connemara pony , i am a begginer jumper (started 1 lesson ago) . In my lesson we take turns for jumping, everyone in my lesson is experienced, so they canter when they jump. I trot when I jump, Only i have a question. All of the horses when its their turn ''automatically'' know that they have to canter, i need my pony to trot instead of canter. So, how can i trot my pony when he thinks its time to canter?

Answer: 
half hault

How to turn leather back to black?

in

I recently bought a new (used) dressage saddle. Functionally- it's perfect. It's just some aesthetic things that are tarnished that I'd like to fix. Where my leg would sit has been rubbed to a red-brown color. Are there any products or home remedies I can use to make the leather black again, or at least darken it?

Answer: 
You can use leather dye as a previous poster said, but it is hard to get even. With it being a black saddle, it would be a little easier, but there can still be variations in the color. IF you do that, wear old clothes riding until the extra dye no longer bleeds onto your clothes. What I have done is use oils and conditioners that darken the leather as you condition it. It is easier to get the right color plus your leather is sooo lovely afterwards. It takes a little more time to do, but for me it has always been worth it. Plus, you don't have to worry about dye seepage as you do with leather dye.

How to convince your parents to let you get a horse?

in

Ive been around horses my whole life and i am very experienced. I have been loaning a horse and she has just been sold. There are stables near my house, and money isnt an issue, how can i convince my parents to let me get a horse?

Answer: 
You can't. Time to grow up little girl.

How to teach my horse to do flying lead changes?

in

How do I teach my horse to do a flying lead change? About how long will it take to teach my horse?

Answer: 
A good exercise to do to teach your horse a flying lead change is to canter around the ring then change direction across the diagonal. As soon as you are on the diagonal, bring your horse back to a trot. Once your horse is trotting, ask for the other lead. Repeat several times, gradually trotting less and less in between. Your horse will eventually do a flying lead change without breaking into the trot. Take your time, it doesn't hurt to practice this exercise many days in a row! Breaking it down will help your horse learn faster and do it correctly.

How to slow a horse down in jumping combinations?

in

So I have spent a great deal of time teaching my horse to approach jumps without rushing.
The only problem area now is in combinations, in jumps with a few strides between the jump she still rushes like mad. Any other jumps on the course and she is fine.
I haven't gone that far into fixing the problem yet, so I was wondering if anyone had some tips or exercises I could do to help her?
Thanks :)

Answer: 
This one girl on youtube, her horse does that and if her horse rushes a jump she makes the mare stop and stand still for a few seconds. You could try making smallish crossrails combinations and try that to see if it works on your horse

Syndicate content