How to improve bunny hops? Would you even call it a bunny hop?

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I can pop the front wheel over a curb but I forget and frankly am not fast enough to do anything about the back wheel to make the transition smooth...

Would you even called it a bunny hop? I guess it is the beginning of one.

Answer: 
Would you even called it a bunny hop? ==''attempted'' wle

How to distinguish good vs bad aluminum bicycle frame?

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The GMC from targer has a 6061 aluminum frame. What makes this frame inferior to other 6061 aluminum frames from other brands?

Answer: 
The bike you mentioned doesn't necessarily have a frame that will shatter under you. It is the REMAINDER of the bike that is so bad coupled with a low end frame. To be sure, that frame is also quite low end and not worth much, but I don't think that is the part you should worry about.

How to tell what year my Diamondback Response Mountain Bike is?

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I am looking into buying new handlebars for my Diamondback response, but need to know the year so I can look up the stock specifications. On the bike it says db78... Not sure what the 78 is. I bought it from a private owner a few years back, so don't have any of the paperwork. Any hints/tips to figuring out the year of my mountain bike would be greatly appreciated, and most informative answer will receive best answer. Thanks in advance.

Answer: 
There is no reason to identify the manufacturing date in order to change your handlebars - and most components. The only time that matters is with some proprietary parts like you will sometimes find with bottom brackets or rear suspension on mountain bikes. The rest of it is just normal industry products that everyone uses. If you really want to identify your frame, the serial number and/or other markings might tell you that. Visit Diamondback's website...if they don't have that info on there then send them an email with all of the numbers you can find, and there's a good chance they can help you out. Those numbers (stickers and/or stamped numbers in the metal) are usually under the bottom bracket shell but sometimes they put them elsewhere...or additional numbers elsewhere. Not a guarantee, but if you know what year/trim line your bike is, they may be able to tell you what it was spec'd with, or you might find that information online at bikepedia.com or somewhere else. But...you don't really need all of this and you can solve your problem much faster without all of that hassle. As for your bars you have a few things to consider. The first is the size of the clamp diameter....the handlebars and stem must match. Most bikes today use a 31.8mm clamp, but there are still plenty of 25.4mm out there...and you can buy either one new with no problem. (There are other sizes for other types of bikes, but this is what you will see with mountain bikes.) Those size numbers are often marked on the parts, but you may have to remove the bars to see that...or you can just measure them. Actually, visually, the difference is unmistakeable, but if you're not familiar with it you won't know this right away. The second consideration is the style/measurements of your current bars - flat bars, riser bars, the degree of backsweep and/or upsweep, and width. The sweep angles might be hard to figure out if they're not marked on the bar or if you can't look up the specs based on the manufacturer & model number of the part (not the bike...the individual part). A knowledgeable shop employee can help you here if you have trouble. There are lots of options available, so you can easily get the exact same style or change to another one that you might like better. Just remember that there are very few proprietary parts on bikes...most are just frames made by the manufacturer that are assembled with any number of brands/types of standard components made by others. This is why you hear people often say to shop for bikes based on design and components/value, rather than the brand name...because it often doesn't matter that much, and other than maybe a warranty on the frame at some point, in the end you're just dealing with parts and components that have absolutely nothing to do with the manufacturer.

How to fix a wobbly front wheel and brake rubbing on Schwinn Sidewinder?

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I recently purchased a 26in Schwinn Women's Sidewinder and put it together, but I'm having trouble with the brakes. The brake pads rub against the wheel, and the wheel wobbles. How can I fix this?

Answer: 
The wheel needs to be trued & the brake pads need to be aligned. If you've never trued up a wheel before, two words of advice...bicycle shop. Not a job for the novice. Couple of links down below. Not unusual for a new bike out of the box to need around $30 to maybe even $50 worth of work. Especially a discount store bicycle. Sorry for the bad news.

How to change the rear inner tube on my single speed road bike?

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I have a Cooper Sebring single speed and am having trouble removing the chain in order to change the rear inner tube. As far as I can see there is no master link on the chain to remove it and there is too much tension in the chain for me to work it off without damaging it. Help please!!!!

Answer: 
Typical fixie or single speed rider. http://www.rei.com/expertadvice/articles/flat+tire.html Loosen the nuts & slide the wheel forward along the horizontal drop outs. http://www.madsnail.net/images/bikebuild/12_salsa_casseroll_dropouts.JPG

How to figure out what size bottom bracket in bmx bike?

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I have a 2010 dk siklon that needs a new bb and cranks only problem is don't know what size for bb. If there is a information page that will tell me that's great but if I know how to do it myself that's even better thanks guys.

Answer: 
It has an american bb, but you willl have to figure out the size of the spindle, just measure the distance of the hole on your bearing (bb) and it will be either 22 or 19mm

How to remove a stubborn bolt on a bicycle?

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I am trying to take the rims off my bike and the bolt is stuuck. Is there any good ways to remove it, or could it be welded on?

Answer: 
When you're trying to remove wheel nuts, use two wrenches in opposition. One side should come off before the other. If they're really being a pain, you can use liquid wrench on the threads. Once one of the nuts come off, you can lock that axle down in a bench vice or a vice wrench. Caveat: this will totally ruin the axle and you'll need to buy a new one from the local bike shop. Once the axle is locked-down, you can use a wrench on the remaining nut. If it's being really stubborn, slip a pipe over the wrench to give you a bigger lever. If you ruin the threads on the axle, you'll need a new one. This will also mean a hub rebuild. Use plenty of degreaser to clean and a small amount of good lithium grease on all the parts you put back in. Also, when you pull the axle, there's a pretty good chance that bearings will want to go everywhere. Keep your workspace clean and put down a few shop towels to catch most of the bearings.

How to increase my average speed on long rides of over 50 miles?

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When I go for long rides in the Lincolnshire Wolds I can never get an average speed of over 12 or 13mph. I know there is a lot of big hills to climb but that average speed is poor right?

How can I increase my average on long rides?

Answer: 
You need to ride longer and push yourself. Start out with an easy 10 min warm up and then pedal at 70-90 rpms in a gear that is easy but gets your heart rate to 85% of max. On some rides go out and climb hills or do sprints until you run out of breath or your legs give out. Drop back to recover and repeat. That makes you stronger and will increase your average speed. The fastest way to improve is to push your body until you cant do anymore. http://www.bicycling.com/training-nutrition/training-fitness

How to figure out the combination to a bike lock?

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THIS IS NOT TO STEAL A BIKE
I have a bike lock that i haven't used in like four years and i forgot the combination.
How can i figure out the combination?

Answer: 
If you can prove it is your bike take it and get the lock cut off. Most local fire departments have tools that will cut through the lock in a big hurry.

How to avoid physical education for 6 weeks?

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This is going to sound weird, but how do I get out of physical education for 6 weeks or so? We are going to be doing cycling next term, which I am dreading for a few reasons, which I don't really want to go on about :/
And, before anyone asks, no, I am not fat or unactive, or lazy, I just really don't want to do cycling. I've been panicking about it since the beginning of the year when I found out we had it, I've lost sleep over this. Can anyone suggest anything?

Answer: 
Let me get this straight. You are going to ask a bunch of cyclists in a cycling forum how to get out of cycling? As far as I am concerned you are barking up the wrong tree. I love cycling. I encourage other people to get out and enjoy a beautiful sport, and to use their bikes for transportation. I would NEVER advise someone on how to get out of doing something I love to do

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