How do strike artist know when to attack and how to do it?

in

Is it natural or trained..
I've been watching a lot of fights from top stand up fighters and I notice they all can counter and move well.. When I fight I can move well but I don't trade punches to good. It feels like I'm lacking dominance in the punch department. My kicks timing are much better. Thing is I can box naturally, but I can't trade well in sparring with taller opponents.. How do I learn to trade punches better?

Answer: 
It is very, VERY trained. Professional boxing/fighting is an art- there are specific techniques you want to use, and specific counters you want to do to certain attacks. Join a boxing/MMA club, you'll learn a whole lot in get in good shape! As for taller opponents, just keep working to close the distance- don't let them outreach you with jabs and back away. Learn to dip and duck under those punches and take powerful/quick steps in.

How to kill the smell and bacteria in my boxing gloves?

in

These things smell horrible. I do MMA and I can't get the smell out. Washing them helps a bit, but I can't do that because they get ruined and waterlogged. I have tried putting them in sealed zip lock bags and then putting those in the freezer, but it didn't help much. Any advice?

Answer: 
Boxing gloves are one of those things that tend to start smelling bad over time. They are a breeding ground for bacteria when you sweat in them regularly. Over time it can get really bad, so bad that other students will avoid sparring with you. Don't be "that guy" (or gal). There are a few things you can do to prevent this from happening, so do yourself and your sparring partners a favour and follow them so no one has to suffer: 1. Don't leave them in your bag! Your warm, dark, damp training bag is the perfect breeding ground for bacteria. If you just leave your gloves in your bag after each sparring session, you'll find your gloves getting stinkier and stinkier, especially in warmer weather. If you do nothing else, take them out of our training bag when you get home. This tip is also offered for uniforms in our article 'Odour Management for Martial Artists.' 2. Air your gloves out. Hang your gloves up in a well-ventilated area. This can be on a sheltered balcony or in a sunny room with a fan. A mesh bag can be a handy tool for carting your gear that can be used to hang your stuff to dry it out. The main thing is that the gloves need to be completely dried out so the bacteria has no moisture in which to breed. 3. Use an anti-bacterial spray. Before hanging your gloves to dry, you can help kill the bacteria by using a spray. Febreeze has an anti-bacterial version that works well for this. If you forgot to air out your gloves, and they're a little stinky, this can also be used as a quick fix to freshen them up when there's no time. Just don't use the spray as your main method of keeping your gloves fresh as it really only masks odours if you don't dry them out properly. 4. Use Glove Dogs. You can buy these from a number of retailers online for around $10/pair, we can get them at our local retailer, Bushido. But you can also make your own cheaply. Find a pair of old cotton knee-high socks. Put cedar chips into socks (you can get them cheaply at a local pet store). Check to see how well it fits in your gloves. Repeat until you get the right amount. Tie knot into the top of the socks. Insert the glove dogs into your gloves when not in use to help absorb odours. You should still air them out, but if there are any lingering smells, these can help. 5. Freeze your gloves. If you're gloves are in a really stinky state such that simply spraying them and airing them out isn't getting the job done, put each glove in a sealed plastic bag then put them in your freezer overnight. Take them out of the freezer then air them out for a couple of days. As we all know, freezing kills a lot of bacteria, so this can help get rid of even the worst odour problems. 6. Use a dryer sheet. A fabric softener dryer sheet is another good method for quickly dealing with boxing glove odours. They don't help dry them out, nor do they kill bacteria, but you can use them to rub the inside of the gloves to help them smell fresher. Of course, make sure you're not allergic or sensitive to the chemicals on the sheet before you do this - it can cause some people to break out into rashes. You can also put a sheet in your training bag if it starts getting smelly.

How to know when to stop chasing opponent in boxing?

in

Ok, so im an aggressive and offensive boxer. I chase my opponent all the time, regardless how good he is. But sometimes i get an opponent that is just really good at running around the ring and is quick and i almost every time miss him. My question is- how can i stop this habbit if its a bad one or is it not ? And also how can i know when to let him come after me and how can i get him to do that ? Thanks !

Answer: 
i like your style. i hate those idiots who run, but i guess it works. look up on youtube ways to cutt off the ring. watch fighters who were good at it like jc chavez. sometimes when they are running from me i like to just stand there and let them realize how stupid they are when they see they ran 30 feet just to get away from a punch. go for body shots when they are trying to slip. they are easier to land than head shots. try to cut off the ring and corner them. then go body body head once you have them cornered. also while in the corner use short uppercuts. they should be launched from just below your own chin. dont laod up on uppercuts throw them from your guard.

How to learn to fight at home?

in

I'm want to be prepared if I ever get into a fist fight. I have a punching bag that hangs from the ceiling in my house. Any techniques or anything like that? I'm a girl so I don't want to like bulk up or anything so I can fight better lol. Also I'm not planning on getting in any fights, I swear I just want to be prepared just in case.

Answer: 
Watch some Youtube videos to learn some basic combinations and footwork, and then practice them on the bag. Dance around the bag, pop-pop-pop. Here is a good example selected at random: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=egzzFic5jJA. Notice how this guy hunches down into a good stance, bobs around for an opening, pops out some quick combinations, and then dances around to a different position. He leads with the left, and uses the right for his power hits. It is hard to develop good skills on your own, but if you can train your body to pull off combinations without having to think about it, it will give a strong advantage. Most fights only last a few seconds, so you want to make those seconds count - hit fast, hard, and many times. Also try to keep up your cardio - in a real fight, people get tired fast, stop moving, and drop their guard. If you have more stamina than your opponent, that will help. Also, you might want to tape your wrists so that you don't injure yourself, and do some exercises to strengthen your wrists. The human skull is a lot harder than a bag, and it is hard to fight if you sprain your wrist on the first solid punch.

How to prepare yourself before joining boxing?

in

I'm 16 years old, wanting to join boxing and master the art. I'll be joining in the beginning of July and was wondering how I should prepare myself before joining. Would be great if a Boxer or Personal Boxing Trainer can answer this. Im trying to find out if I should be running- how long?, What type of muscles should I focus on to become a great boxer, etc.
Just give me as much information you can, thank you.

Answer: 
why dont you find out how hard it is to be a boxer before you become one. hit a heavybag for 3 minutes without stopping and you have to be able to run for 5 miles or more.. its not going to be easy your going to have to train abs. lots of punching and running is needed and strength workout to. try this for a week straight and see if you still want to become a boxer

How to build endurance as a boxer?

in

My coach and everybody keeps telling me to just box everyday is that true?

I weight lift also and if anyone is familiar with weight training you have to give your body time to rest after your workout or else your just constantly breaking down your muscles without giving it time to repair. Why is it not the same with boxing?

Answer: 
Work out

How to immediately get out of the way of a straight right hand when you are a south paw?

in

Like slipping to my left is not really the way I wanna be going and slipping to the right is but its not something I can immediately do I would have to rotate a bit before I could slip to the right and that rotation takes too much time.

Blocking parrying bobbing etc are too risky for a really hard puncher how do I best get my head out of the way of that straight right hand when I am a southpaw?

Answer: 
It's not easy to avoid a right straight if you're a southpaw, but it's easier to evade if your lead leg is outside the opponent's, that way, you can see it coming and counter with a left. If you watch some Pacquiao vids, he beats his opponent to the punch because the opponent is at a disadvantaged angle, Pac just has to shoot the straight left down the pipe, while the opponent's right has to travel more distance to land. In short, footwork is key, just nimble, short, quick steps to find your positioning, with some head movement to lessen your chance of getting hit, then counter your opponent's mistakes.

How to win a fight against someone taller than you?

in

How to win a one on one fight against a guy who is taller and older than me by 2 years (he's 19) any tips? no b*llshit about not fighting, its to late for that.

Answer: 
it doesn't matter how tall or old they are. as soon as you can kick em as hard as you can between the legs. most guys will drop like a bag of hammers. when he goes down you can do with him what you want. if he doesn't,RUN.

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